CinemaDave (cinemadave) wrote,
CinemaDave
cinemadave

"The Weasel's Tale" is sophisticated vermin



A film from Argentina with English Subtitles, "The Weasel's Tale" owes a debit to Agatha Christie, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Billy Wilder and Elaine Viets. The setting is the mansion of a faded movie star Mara Odaz (Graciela Borges), her wheelchair bound painter-husband, her former movie director and a writer who wrote her best lines. The mansion is ornate and could have been used for Rian Johnson's "Knives Out", the sequel. Yet beyond the cozy trappings that something is afoul, vermin has infiltrated the home of the faded diva. Yet, if one thinks "The Weasel's Tale" will be a sequel to the cult classic horror movies "Willard" or "Ben," the first victim of this movie is a weasel.


Despite the "Sunset Boulevard" overtones of the opening credits, "The Weasel's Tale" is a movie about elderly relationships and their resistance to change. While the relationship between these four individuals is weird, there is comfort in their surroundings.

As the writer says, enter the villains - two real estate developers who are fans of Mara Odaz. Playing on an old actress's vanity, the young real estate developers offer a cash deal. To give away more of the plot would be a disservice, but suffice to say conflict arises from the five individual's motivations.


Clocking in over two hours long, "The Weasel's Tale" is too long for it's own good. However director (and cowriter) Juan José Campanella has crafted a dark comedy with humor found in details in a vulnerable man's art work. By utilizing a soundtrack of American Music featuring Brenda Lee, The Platters, Perry Como and Chubby Checker, Campanella created an entertaining experience for a leisurely afternoon.




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