March 13th, 2021

Cinema Dave  Swashbuckling ournalist and

Lent Day 24 Cinema Dave to perform BASS on Hash Pipe by Weezer




As a student with the School of Rock, Cinema Dave will play bass on this song,




According to an interview with Weezer frontman Rivers Cuomo, "Hash Pipe" was written on the same night as the song "Dope Nose" off Maladroit. The story goes that Cuomo took "a bunch of Ritalin and had like three shots of tequila," paced around for a while, then wrote both songs.[1]

Weezer drummer Patrick Wilson is featured on the cover of the song's CD single.[2] Since late 2001, the band has played the song live with a reworked guitar solo that no longer follows the verse melody.

The song is about a transvestite prostitute.[3
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hash_Pipe



With a tempo of 128 bpm, "Hash Pipe" is composed in the key of A minor.[4] The opening line, "I can't help my feelings, I go out of my mind", is quoted from The Beatles' "You Can't Do That".



Cinema Dave  Swashbuckling ournalist and

Lent Day 24 Cinema Dave to perform BASS on Jet's Are You Gonna Be My Girl



As a student with the School of Rock, Cinema Dave will play bass on this song,



Written by Nic Cester and Cameron Muncey, the song is often cited for similarities to Iggy Pop's "Lust for Life" (particularly its drum pattern and near-identical guitar riff);[4][5] and the 1999 song "Screwdriver" from The White Stripes.[6] The band, however, argues that "Are You Gonna Be My Girl" has more in common with 1960s Motown songs, namely "I'm Ready for Love" by Martha and the Vandellas and "You Can't Hurry Love" by The Supremes.

Chris Cester responded to media commentary regarding the similarities, stating in a Jared Story interview that the beat was taken from Motown, referring to a meeting between Iggy Pop and himself:

It's funny because I asked him point blank about that. He said I was crazy. He said that when he and David Bowie were writing "Lust for Life", they were ripping off Motown's beat. It's funny that he said that to me because we also thought we were ripping off Motown more than "Lust for Life". To be honest with you that kind of annoyed me a lot, because I always thought it was really lazy. People just go well Lust for Life is more well-known so that's what they go for, but if you listen to a song like "You Can't Hurry Love" (The Supremes) I think you'll find its closer to "Are You Gonna Be My Girl" than "Lust for Life" ever was. And that's what Iggy said as well.[7]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Are_You_Gonna_Be_My_Girl





Cinema Dave  Swashbuckling ournalist and

Lent Day 24 Cinema Dave to sing "ALL STAR" by Smash Mouth



As a student with the School of Rock, Cinema Dave will sing this song,



"All Star" is a song by the American rock band Smash Mouth from their second studio album, Astro Lounge (1999). Written by Greg Camp and produced by Eric Valentine, the song was released on May 4, 1999, as the first single from Astro Lounge. The song was one of the last tracks to be written for Astro Lounge, after the band's record label Interscope requested for more songs that could be released as singles. In writing it, Camp drew musical influence from contemporary music by artists like Sugar Ray and Third Eye Blind, and sought out to create an "anthem" for outcasts. In contrast to the more ska punk style of Smash Mouth's debut album Fush Yu Mang (1997), the song features a more radio-friendly style.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/All_Star_(song)

During a dark time in the autumn of 2015, Cinema Dave shot this video -



"All Star" is set in the key of F♯ major, with a tempo of 104 beats per minute.[5] Writers have described it musically as alternative rock[6] and power pop.[7] During a 2017 interview, Camp stated he was interested in exploring several layers of meaning with the stripped-down song; the social battle cry, the sports anthem, the fanbase affirmation, the poetic lyricism, the sweeping melody, the inclusion, the artistic music videos, and more.[8] Camp described the song as "a daily affirmation that life is, in general, good", something he called a "tradition" for Smash Mouth; according to him, the band frequently read fan mail they received from kids, parents, and teachers thanking them for making "fun and lighthearted" music.[9]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/All_Star_(song)



Billboard staff writer Gab Ginsburg noted the song's lasting cultural impact following its appearance in Shrek and the "hundreds" of popular meme videos; Berman felt the song had "a life of its own" and became a "cultural artifact".[19][22]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/All_Star_(song)