November 7th, 2006

Cinema Dave  Swashbuckling ournalist and

FLiFF 38 minutes of a "Recycled Life" begs for a sequel



There is a dump in Guatemala that is the economic resource for low income people.
For many years on a daily basis, the natives would visit their dump to find food and clothing for their families. Despite their horrible living conditions, “Recycled Life” reveals raw dignity of the people During an interview and without being self conscious, a mother breast feeds her baby on camera. Despite the dismal lifestyle of people, “Recycle Lives” presents life affirming values under sunny skies.

That is, until children become injured.
When an accidental fire burns a part of the dump and the grounds before becomes dangerous, government regulations take effect. The natives do not understand why their source of food and shelter is being condemned and they must cope with a new way of life..It is predicted that within 2 years, the trash dump will meet capacity and 4000 people will be displaced.

Narrated by Edward James Olmos, this thirty eight minute documentary begs for a sequel screening at the 23 Annual Fort Lauderdale International Film Festival.
Cinema Dave  Swashbuckling ournalist and

FLiFF "Gray Matters" is really "Gay Matters"



“Gray Matters” opens with the feel and the tone of a 1930s Preston Sturges screwball comedy with the elegance of a Fred Astaire and Ginger Rodgers duet. Gray (Heather Graham) and Sam (Thomas Cavanaugh) are Manhattan dwelling brother and sister who share similar interests in the arts and entertainment. One day, the brother proposes to Charlie (Bridget Moynahan) and Gray develops surprising and contradictory feelings.

On the Eve of a Las Vegas style wedding, Gray and Charlie share a bath and, after a drunken night of karaoke, a kiss. During the chapel weeding on the Vegas strip, a new love triangle is developed between the newlyweds and the maid of honor.

The Romance narrative follows the predictable narrative structure of the romance movies from the 1930s though the 1990s. Like the Kevin Kline comedy from 1997, “In & Out,” it is the variable of character motivations that makes “Gray Matters” unpredictable.